Special Turkish Gullac Dessert Recipe by Famous Chef Aysenur Altan

June 22, 2022

Special Turkish Gullac Dessert Recipe by Famous Chef Aysenur Altan

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The ‘Gullac’ is one of the famous Turkish sweet dishes. This dish has its roots in the Turkish Ottoman empire. The Ottomans are known for their variety of food. Ottomans cuisine is the main reason for such delicious cuisine of Turkey that no one abandoned it, not even today! Though I have no expertise in cooking Turkish meals but on the basis of my personal experience, I can assure you that the following is the best Turkish Gullac Recipe. I get this recipe from the famous chef and food traveller of Turkey Aysenur Atlan.

 

Some Words About Turkish Desserts: 

 

Turkish desserts cuisine

 

It’s no surprise that Turkish delicacies are mentioned as a bribe in Western classics like C.S. Lewis’ ‘The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.’ It’s no surprise that travel writers are always drawn to the exotic idea of sweets from this part of the world. Perhaps it is the outcome of the Ottoman Empire’s blending of many cultures, or perhaps it is the genealogical history of Turkic people travelling from Far East Asia to Asia Minor today. Nonetheless, there is something for everyone in the dessert department.

 

What Is Güllaç?

 

Turkish sweet cuisine
Turkish Gullac Recipe

 

Gullac (güllaç in Turkish characters) is a simple yet excellent dish. Corn starch, wheat flour, and water are used to make the sheets. They are cooled after being steeped in sweetened heated milk and covered with walnuts. I don’t want to translate it into English since it may be meaningless. Gül means rose in Turkish, and aş means food; gullac is an acronym for güllü aş, which implies rose-flavoured food. Gullac is the current name for this delicious delicacy since it is simpler to say than güllü aş. So, what is the connection between rose and this dessert Actually, rose water, not the rose, has a tie with this Turkish treat.

 

History of Gullac At a Glance:

 

authentic Turkish Recipes

 

Rose water was traditionally utilised as the dominant flavour in this dish in Ottoman culture because of its refreshing impact. Today, you may add rose water or not, just like you would while preparing Turkish delight. Some individuals utilise rose water, while others do not. Personally, I don’t care for its flavour in gullac, therefore I avoid it. But that doesn’t imply it tastes awful; in fact, it adds a refreshing flavour to the dessert.

 

 

People used to produce sheets from corn starch, flour, and water in the early Ottoman Empire, and they could preserve them for months. People used to soften these sheets with milk and sugar since they were dry and crunchy. It was most likely not a dessert at the time, but rather the main course. The basic components in the meal were the best part for those people.

 

 

The second reason people like it is that they may store the dried sheets for a long time. Then, as the empire grew wealthier, it became a dessert special for the palace and a favourite of the sultans. Today, it is famous as one of the palace sweets. If you buy the dessert (not the sheets) from a pastry store, you will notice that it is not inexpensive.

 

The Ottomans’ way of Garnishing Gullac:

 

Another Ottoman gullac custom is that it is usually garnished with pomegranate, and I enjoy seeing these tiny crimson beads on the white surface of this delicacy. I believe they complement each other and speak to our eyes first. And I like to garnish with a third excellent element. Pistachios! When you combine these three, the pleasure you feel multiplies.

 

Where to Get Gullac Sheets?

 

People no longer make these sheets because it takes specialised skills. At the marketplaces, they are offered in packets. A packet contains roughly 15 sheets. As far as I know, two major enterprises, Saffetabdullah Gullaclari and Istanbul Gullac manufacture and sell these sheets to markets.

 

 

You might believe they’re similar to phyllo sheets, but they’re not. Gullac sheets are very white, thin, and crunchy.

These sheets are entirely natural and contain no additives. Furthermore, it is a light dessert. These are only two of the reasons why people favour gullac as a sweet ending to their iftar meal. Because Muslims fast from dawn to sunset throughout Ramadan, their bodies require more sugar than usual to satisfy their hunger.

 

How To Make Turkish Gullac at Home?

To make Turkish Gullac Recipe at home all you have to do is just follow the given steps. 

 

Step 1:

 

 

cooking step of gallac recipe

 

Heat the milk and sugar (plus 1 tablespoon rosewater if desired) in a saucepan until the sugar melts. Stir it now and then. Allow it to cool somewhat if it is too hot to touch. We can start making our dessert when it becomes warm enough. If you use it too hot, your dessert may get sticky.

 

Step 2:

 

Gallac Sheets

 

Second, arrange the layers in a baking pan. In the pan, place a gullac sheet. Warm milk should be used to wet gullac sheets. Repeat with the remaining five sheets.

 

 

Turkish Sweet dish

 

Spread the crushed walnut on top after the sixth one.

 

Step 3:

 

Gallac recipe from Turkey

 

Then, one by one, place the remaining five sheets and soak them with milk. When you’ve finished the tenth one, pour the remaining milk over it. And placing them in the pan, they don’t have to be in great form.

 

When they are moist with milk, they will merge. When you pour the milk, you will notice the sheets rising; do not touch them. Refrigerate it for at least 2 hours after wrapping it in stretch film.

 

Step 5:

 

Turkish desserts

 

Finally, garnish it. I always leave the garnishing to the last since pomegranates and pistachio may affect the colour of the gullac (you can also garnish it with other fruits like strawberries, bananas, etc). Transfer from the refrigerator, cut into squares or rectangles, garnish, and serve.

 

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Turkish Gullac Recipe

June 22, 2022
: 1 piece for each
: 30 min
: 30 min
: 60 min
: Medium Difficulty level

Gullac (güllaç in Turkish characters) is a simple yet excellent dish. Corn starch, wheat flour, and water are used to make the sheets. They are cooled after being steeped in sweetened heated milk and covered with walnuts. I don't want to translate it into English since it may be meaningless. Gül means rose in Turkish, and aş means food; gullac is an acronym for güllü aş, which implies rose-flavoured food. Gullac is the current name for this delicious delicacy since it is simpler to say than güllü aş. So, what is the connection between rose and this dessert Actually, rose water, not the rose, has a tie with this Turkish treat.

By:

Ingredients
  • 10 Gullac Sheets
  • 2.5 Liter Milk
  • One and Half cup Sugar (or to taste)
  • One cup crumbled Walnuts
  • Ground Pistachio and Pomegranates or Strawberries
Directions
  • Step 1 Heat the milk and sugar (plus 1 tablespoon rosewater if desired) in a saucepan until the sugar melts. Stir it now and then. Allow it to cool somewhat if it is too hot to touch. We can start making our dessert when it becomes warm enough. If you use it too hot, your dessert may get mushy.
  • Step 2 Place a sheet of gullac in the pan. Warm milk should be used to wet it. Repeat with the remaining five sheets. Spread the crushed walnut on top after the sixth one. Then, one by one, place the remaining five sheets and soak them with milk. When you’ve finished the tenth one, pour the remaining milk over it. Placing them in the pan, they don’t have to be in great form. While they are moist with milk, they will merge. When you pour the milk, you will notice the sheets rising
  • Step 3 do not touch them. Refrigerate it for at least 2 hours after wrapping it in stretch film.
  • Step 4 Remove from the refrigerator, cut into squares or rectangles, garnish, and serve.


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