Pakistani Homestyle Aloo Ghost Recipe (Mutton/Lamb and Aloo Curry)

March 23, 2022

Pakistani Homestyle Aloo Ghost Recipe (Mutton/Lamb and Aloo Curry)

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Pakistani Homestyle Aloo Gosht Recipe is one of the main curry dishes of Pakistani cuisine, and it has been one of my favourite dishes since childhood. This recipe has its fan following in Pakistan as well as outside Pakistan. Since I started writing or blogging about Pakistani food, I want to share this fantastic recipe. But for some reason, it was delayed; however, in this blog, you’ll learn how you can cook Pakistani Homestyle Aloo Gosht with ease. This blog also tells you how to cook the same recipe in instinct pot without losing its original taste.

 

What is Aloo Gosht:

 

 

 

 

Aloo Gosht is a meat-and-potatoes dish popular in Pakistan and northern India. Unlike restaurant-famous mutton dishes like Rogan Josh or Lamb/Goat Korma, this is a warm, comforting dish found in many South Asian households. Like a traditional Chicken Curry, Aloo Gosht has extra gravy or curry (commonly referred to as Shorba’ or ‘Salan’). This gives it a soupier texture, making it ideal for scooping up with roti, paratha, or rice.

 

Needed Ingredients in Aloo Gosht:

 

Oil: Authentic curry is distinguished by a small oil film on the final dish. I used 1/4 cup, which was sufficient to give it a homey appearance and flavour. You’ll also need oil to fry the meat before and after it’s cooked.
Ghee: Not required, although I use a small amount for a more delicate flavour. Butter can also be used as a replacement.
Aloo Gosht is usually cooked with bone-in goat or lamb chopped into 2′′ pieces. Goat is tough to come by in most supermarkets; however, it is readily available pre-cut at Halal meat markets.
Meat Cut: I usually get the mixed cut, which is numerous cuts. Choose the leg if you prefer meatier cuts.

 

 

Tips for Preparations:

I typically use a food processor to assist acquire the correct consistency for thinner, soupier curries.

To finely chop the onions, use the pulse function on your blender. If you combine them, they’ll leak water and it’ll be more difficult to brown them.
To assist the tomatoes blending into the curry, make a rough tomato purée. I’m not sensitive about tomato peel in my curry, but you can puree it even further if you like. To peel the tomato skins, some people prefer to immerse them in boiling water for 3-5 minutes.
What if you don’t have access to a food processor? To finely cut the onions and tomatoes, simply use your knife.

 

Green chilli peppers: are used to provide a hint of heat and flavour to dishes. Use half of a Serrano or a small Thai/eye bird’s chilli pepper.

Cumin seeds, cloves, and cardamom pods are among the entire spices used in this dish. Other whole herbs, such as dried bay leaves, black peppercorns, or a cinnamon stick, can be included. You’ll also need common ground spices, which you probably already have.
Salt, kosher: I like kosher salt, but you can use whatever salt you have on hand. Because if you use table salt, you’ll need less than the recipe calls for. His is a soupy curry; a generous amount of salt is required to flavour it well. If you whole-milk yoghurt: I used yoghurt to add flavour to the curry and thicken it. If you want to make it dairy-free, leave off the cheese.

Potatoes: I prefer russet potatoes since they have a better flavour and cook faster. If you choose a different type, you may need to add them sooner to prevent the meat from overcooking.

 

aloo gosht

 

 

How To Pakistani Aloo Gosht:

Step 1: Season the goat/lamb meat with salt and sauté it until it is beautifully seared—this aids in flavour development.

Step 2: Saute the garlic and ginger until fragrant. Then add the majority of the remaining ingredients and mix well (onion, tomatoes, green chilli, whole and ground spices, and the remaining salt). Bring a pot of water to a boil. Because you’ll be sautéing it down once the meat cooks, you don’t need a lot of water. Cover and simmer over low heat to get the beef nice and cooked.

Tip: If your beef isn’t fully tender, skip to the following step. When squeezed with a wooden spoon, you want it to break. Continue to cook if not.

 

Step 3: Increase the heat to high and sauté the remaining moisture/water content. To keep the meat from breaking, we stir it once in a while. Continue to sauté (bhunai) for another 5-6 minutes after the water has gone.

Bhunai:

The Bhunai is a South Asian cooking technique that is best defined as a combination of sautéing and frying. Bhunai is used to reduce the onions and tomatoes into a homogeneous, coherent masala while infusing the meat with flavour. We don’t have to brown the onions at first because we’re taking the time to simmer it down. The oil will naturally separate from the masala at this point.

 

Pakistani Aloo Gosht

 

Step 4: Finally, add the potatoes and water and the yoghurt. Allow the potatoes to simmer until fork-tender, covered. The oil will naturally rise to the top after the frying is complete.

Step 5: That’s all there is to it! You’ve completed the task. Garnish with cilantro and garam masala. Try not to eat a bite straight from the pan.

 

Aloo Gosht Instant Pot Recipe

Pressure cookers have been used by Pakistani and Indian cooks to produce mutton curries for decades. It’s no surprise, then, that Aloo Gosht works wonderfully in an Instant Pot. Here’s how to put it together:

  • On the Instant Pot, select ‘Sauté mode’.  Add the oil, ghee, goat or lamb meat, and 3/4 teaspoon salt after the pan is hot. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring regularly until the colour has changed and the edges have seared.

  • Sauté for a minute after adding the garlic and ginger. Continue to mix in the onion, tomatoes, green chilli pepper, whole and ground spices (excluding garam masala), and the remaining 1 teaspoon salt. If necessary, add 1/4 cup water (the less, the better, as this will be sautéed out). At least a third of the meat should be wet.

  • Cancel Sauté: Set the timer for 20 minutes (or 22 min if using larger or meaty pieces such as shoulder or leg).

  • Allow 10 minutes for the pressure to naturally release. The meat will be cooked through but not fall-apart tender. When pounded with a wooden spoon, the flesh should shatter. If not, continue to pressure cook for another 5 minutes. Select ‘Sauté – More’ from the drop-down menu. Once hot, swirl occasionally to cook off any remaining moisture or water content (5-7 minutes). Continue to sauté (bhunai) for another 5-6 minutes after the water has gone. The masala will thicken and diminish as the curry cooks, and the oil will separate from the stew.

  • Take Sauté mode off:  Pour in the yoghurt and whisk to combine. Depending on how much curry/shorba you want, add potatoes and 2–2 14 cups water. Pressure cook for 5-6 minutes on high, depending on the size of the potatoes. Allow 5 minutes for the pressure to naturally release. Taste and adjust the salt as needed. (I normally require a smidgeon more.) Garnish with cilantro and garam masala.

 

 

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Alo Gosht Recipe

March 23, 2022
: 4
: 20 min
: 40 min
: 1 hr
: Medium Difficulty Level

Aloo Gosht is a meat-and-potatoes dish popular in Pakistan and northern India. Unlike restaurant-famous mutton dishes like Rogan Josh or Lamb/Goat Korma, this is a warm, comforting dish found in many South Asian households. Like a traditional Chicken Curry, Aloo Gosht has extra gravy or curry (commonly referred to as Shorba’ or ‘Salan’). This gives it a soupier texture, making it ideal for scooping up with roti, paratha, or rice.

By:

Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup neutral oil (grapeseed or avocado oil, for example)
  • 1 tbsp ghee (butter substitute)
  • 1-1.2 pound (545 g) bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-in bone-
  • 1 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt (less if using regular/table salt), divided into 6-7 (1 tbsp) portions crushed or finely minced garlic cloves
  • one tbsp (1 inch) crushed or finely chopped ginger
  • 1 medium (225-250 g) finely chopped yellow onion (See Note 2)
  • 2 small (200 g) tomatoes, either puréed in a food processor or finely diced (I use Roma).
  • 1-2 small green chilli peppers, chopped or sliced, such as Thai chilli or 1/2 Serrano
  • 2 cardamom pods (green)
  • 3 whole garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1.5-2 teaspoons coriander powder, more if you prefer a stronger flavour, less if you prefer a milder flavour
  • 1/2-1 tsp cumin powder, more if you prefer a stronger taste, less if you prefer a milder flavour
  • a half teaspoon of red chilli powder, or to taste
  • a half teaspoon of turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp black pepper, ground
  • 2 (320-350g) small russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1.5-2
Directions
  • Step 1 Over medium-high heat, heat a medium Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot. Pour in the oil and ghee. Add the goat or lamb meat and 3/4 teaspoon salt after the pan is hot. Cook, stirring periodically, for 6-7 minutes, or until the colour has changed and some edges have seared.
  • Step 2 Sauté for a minute after adding the garlic and ginger. Continue to mix onion, tomatoes, green chilli pepper, whole and ground spices (excluding garam masala), and the remaining one teaspoon salt. 1 to 1 1/4 cup water (the less, the better because the water will be sautéed off) to cover at least 1/3 of the meat. Bring to a boil this mixture.
  • Step 3 Reduce the heat to a soft simmer once it reaches a boil (low or low-medium). Cook for 1 hour and 30 minutes, or until the meat is fully cooked but not fall-off-the-bone tender (see Note 3). When pounded with a wooden spoon, the flesh should shatter. If not, cover and simmer for another 15 minutes.
  • Step 4 Raise the heat to be high and sauté the remaining water content/moisture for 5-7 minutes, stirring regularly. Continue to sauté (bhunai) for another 5-6 minutes after the water has gone. The masala will thicken and diminish as the curry cooks, and the oil will separate from the stew.
  • Step 5 Reduce to low heat and stir in the yoghurt. Add the potatoes and 2–2 14 cups water depending on how much curry you want.
  • Step 6 Raise the heat to be high to bring to a boil, then reduce to low/medium-low to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook for an additional 23-25 minutes, or until the beef and potatoes are fork-tender. If necessary, taste and adjust the salt. (I normally require a smidgeon more.)
  • Step 7 Allow the curry to boil, covered, for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the oil rises to the surface. Turn the heat off. Garnish with cilantro and garam masala. With roti, paratha, naan, or basmati rice, if desired.

Recipe Source: Tea For Turmeric


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